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10 stencilled concrete design ideas

Stencilled concrete isn’t a new innovation, but it’s a popular option for homeowners wanting to renovate, and for investors wanting to put the finishing touches on an investment property. You might’ve seen some of these patterns before on someone else’s landscape and decided you want to ‘borrow’ one for your own.

 

  • Flagstone

This is one of the most generic stencilled concrete patterns available, but you can dress it up with bright colours to make it stand out.

 

  • Herringbone

Resembling the bones of the fish, this type of design is common with pavers  as it makes  use of their long and short edges. You can use this pattern in your pergola and barbecue areas.

 

  • European Fan

This design is made up of small square tiles spread in an arching fan pattern. It’s also called ‘fish scales’.

 

  • Wood/timber

Yes, you really can get concrete to look like wood. At least you’ll never have to worry about it rotting! Have this stencilled concrete design on the patio for a rustic feel.

 

  • Compass

This adds a touch of pizazz to an otherwise plain driveway. The compass comes in a variety of shapes and designs, just speak with your contractor about what you want. Get the creative juices flowing and pick out a few colours to make the design really stand out.

 

  • Diamond tile

This pattern comprises of octagonal tiles with square or ‘diamond’ tiles in between.

 

  • Interlocking diamonds

Placing this stencilled concrete pattern in the middle breaks up monotonous driveways. To get the diamonds to show up properly, choose contrasting colours.

 

  • Convict brick

This style mimics the crudely cut stone made by convicts back in the day when they were blasting rocks from quarries and cliffsides. You can find the real deal in heritage homes. In stencil form, it’s a cross between a cobblestone and a flagstone.

 

  • Patios and pathways

Having the patio connected can really tie a landscape together. You can go from one end of the yard to the other without having to tread a foot on the grass. This feature is good if you want to have a yard or garden for people to admire, rather than play in.

 

  • Driveways to front doors

Having an even pathway when your arms are loaded with bags saves you the worry of tripping, at least. A seamless path from the driveway to the front door will give a good first impression to visitors and potential tenants (if you’re a property manager).

 

stencilled concrete designs