concreting

How concreting adds value

Concreting is done before almost everything else  during a building project. It’s a base material that nobody pays much mind to, until something needs to get done. Concreting adds value to properties in various ways, not just monetary.

 

Tough as concrete

The material, when poured as a slab combined with rebar, withstands a lot of pressure. Domestic blends are typically 3500 psi (pounds per square inch) and won’t crack unless you plan on dropping a few bowling balls on it.

Concreting projects aren’t always large; sometimes all that’s needed is some resurfacing. Old slabs with a few cracks are due for a facelift, and your contractor won’t need a lot of time to get it done.

 

Designer concrete

When you renovate your house, having a concrete floor can add that ‘industrial’ feel that’s so popular in magazines and television shows. There’s also concrete countertops, concrete stairs, the list goes on.

Speak with your contractor about your ideas  and how you want the end result to look. Concreting and interior design actually go together quite well. There’s plenty of finishes and colouring options. Acid staining and polishing can give the impression that a slab is made of granite or marble. This is a great look in kitchens, bathrooms,  and outdoor leisure areas.

 

Patch-ups and coverings

Cracks and the like are trip hazards. You see these mostly on old footpaths. One wrong step and next thing you know you’re eating pavement. Commercial patch-ups are disruptive if they’re large scale, like a carpark or long stretch of footpaths. For safety’s sake, though, they’re necessary after a few decades.

Covercrete, or spray concrete, is easily and quickly applied to tired surfaces. When a space needs a facelift but the ground doesn’t need ripping up, covercrete is the way to go. This type of concreting adds value to a home because you can get a design stencilled in it. This is what you see in driveways and some patios. There’s plenty of ways to design covercrete, from ‘pavers’ patterns in red ochre to a fleur-de-lis in royal blue.